Quoted in PsychCentral: 5 Ways to Deepen Your Relationship With Yourself

In this post from PsychCentral, I share my perspective on how self-compassion is a fundamental aspect of having a deeper relationship with yourself. I suggested a few ways to do this. For example, as you go about your day, notice what you say “yes” to. These are activities and needs that will deeply nourish you. Then listen to yourself, and act on these yeses. I shared these examples: “Yes, I’m going to go out with friends rather than work late (like I do most nights); yes, I want to take that class that is interesting to me that I think I don’t have time for; yes, I want to take care of my finances so I’m going to call my student loan servicer; yes, I want to be more mindful in my relationships so I’m going to reflect on what I want to say in response to a challenging email.”

Quoted in PsychCentral: Why Self-Compassion Isn't Self-Indulgent

In this article on PsychCentral, I share my perspective on the very common idea that self-compassion is about letting yourself off the hook and having no self-discipline. “Shinraku likened self-compassion to being a “good-enough parent”: a parent who’s kind and gives their kids boundaries. ‘A good-enough parent doesn’t just let their child eat ice cream and play video games all day every day; they know that indulging them in that way would actually not be compassionate or kind. It would be harmful.’”

Interview: How to Stop Speaking Harshly to Yourself

I was recently interviewed for this article in PsychCentral about how self-compassion can help in quieting the inner critic. I also shared my perspective on how “our harsh self-talk is actually an alarm that indicates we’re facing something scary. … If harsh self-talk is an alarm, your fear is the fire, Shinraku said. ‘We get so caught up in how loud and harsh the sound of the alarm is, that we do not attend to the fire that’s burning—the fear and suffering that require our attention and compassion.’”